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Road Trip Planning and Report Writeup #3453
    Date first written: 2019.04.10   Review Date:2019.04.10

Table of Contents
1. Preface
2. Highway Navigation
3. Highway Waypoints
4. Lists of Peaks
5. Side Trips

1. Preface
This is a general checklist for myself and anybody else planning to do long road/climbing trips such as California Death Valley Road Trip. It is meant to be useful both before and after the trip. Before the trip, it is useful to investigate possible campgrounds, and nearby peaks that may be of interest.

It covers how to set up the navigation Apps on your cell phone, how to perform key functions.

After the trip, it discusses how to prepare the waypoints using GMap "Draw and Save."

2. Highway Navigation
Navigation: We navigated using paper road maps of each state. So we had a Washington, Oregon, Nevada and California. When driving we used the OSMAnd GPS App running on Betsy's Samsung Galaxy S9. OSMand is definitely worth knowing about, see Osmand (Open Street Maps for Android) for details. It allows you to download entire provinces and states in Vector format. OSMAnd isn't the best for actual hikes, for these we still use Backcountry Navigator (BCN).

3. Highway Waypoints
In preparing the trip report, I use GMap "Draw and Save" to mark the route. Just click..click..click along the highways. Label important junctions. A practical scale is within 1 km in high interest areas such as Death Valley. Zoom in till the scale bar in the lower right corner shows 1 km. Then in points such that your line is within 1 km of the road line on the map.

In areas of little interest, such as vast stretches of Interstate I-5, a scale of 2 km or 5 km is fine, but zoom in to position the key junctions exactly.

In general, you just want waypoints for where you drove the car. Hiking waypoints are best handled as a separate trip report.

In your main report, to make it easy to edit the waypoints later, I typically label significant towns and highway junctions.

Having a lot of waypoints makes updates slow because it has to build the map each time. In order to edit big trips more quickly, one can temporarily move most of the waypoints to the edit notes field, and thus avoid processing them every time you do an update. Then at the end cut and paste all the waypoints back into the report.

4. Lists of Peaks
Once you have picked the highways you plan to use, it is useful to see what peaks might be close enough to those highways to permit day trips. One way I'll do next time is to pick several center points along the route, and list all the P500 peaks that lie along that part of the highway.
 See Death Valley

I haven't quite worked out how best to do this.

5. Side Trips
On any road trip of interest to Bivouac you hopefully will do numerous side hikes. These are best handled as separate trip reports. You then put links into the main report for these side trips, and link the side trip back to the main report.