Bivouac.com   Document   Home     Help   Index     Login
Raw Gpx Database #3431
    Date first written: 2018.02.17   Review Date:2018.02.17

Table of Contents
1. Introduction
2. Private Gpx files
3. Uses
4. Relationships with other records
5. Creating Custom Gpx Files

1. Introduction
The Raw Gpx Database is a quick way to share gpx files. Or to use as a private workspace to examine gpx files, or to trace them in GMap for use in trip reports. You can set it to "Public" or "Private". Public ones can be viewed or downloaded by other members. "Raw" means directly from your GPS, as opposed to the "finished" Gpx files that are generated from a Bivouac waypoints field. "Raw Gpx" will also handle raw KML files from Google Earth. Uploading raw gpx files is a two step process: first you insert a data record with a title and short description, and second you upload the actual gpx file. Once uploaded, two more links appear:
 - a link appears to view it on GMap.
 - a link for other people to download it.

It will handle gpx, kml, and kmz files. For example, suppose you had a gpx file describing a route that you wanted to share with other members, but didn't want to write up a full trip report. All you need to do is insert a gpx record, put in a brief description and then upload the file.

Others can read about your file and download it. It's a quick way to share gpx files. I suppose this is a way of writing "lightweight" trip reports. To make an actual trip report, you would display the Gpx on Gmap, and then use GMap "Draw and Save" to make Bivouac waypoints, just as before.

2. Private Gpx files
When you insert a gpx file, there is a field called "Complete". It defaults to "No", which means the gpx won't show up for other members. However, you will see it on your own Authors Menu.

Gpx records can be inserted either into the main list, or into the list on your Author's page.

3. Uses
The raw Gpx database can be used in a number of ways. It can handle any type of gpx or kml file.

 - Trip reports can refer to supplementary gpx files in addition to the main set of waypoints. For example a climbing camp could have 5 different gpx files, one for each day's climb.

The gpx files are not limited to one track, you could upload a gpx file that contained multiple tracks and waypoints. For example, you could go into Google Earth and create a big kml file showing several ski routes at the same time, and each one having a description.

 

Relationship with Trip Gpx Files
 Don't forget that every trip report allows you to download a gpx file that corresponds to the Bivouac waypoints. You can still upload raw Gpx files to trip reports, but not download the raw file. (too confusing).
 

4. Relationships with other records
Relationship with Waypoint working files:
 This Gpx database will replace the "raw gpx" function in Waypoint working Files. That will make the Waypoint Working Files simpler, because it will only involve the bivouac waypoints. At some point I may move some of the raw files over to the new facility.

5. Creating Custom Gpx Files
Most people will just upload gpx files created by the "export" function in their GPS. For example, you can export either a single track log or a whole set of waypoints from a trip.

However if you open a gpx file in any text editor, you can edit it directly, add new waypoints, combine track logs, etc. I call these "custom" gpx files. In order to create custom gpx files you have to be familiar with a few special tags like <wpt> and <trk> that mark waypoints and tracks. For this purpose I have prepared a separate document titled Creating Custom Gpx Files. And also a separate discussion which you can subscribe to called How to Create Custom Gpx Files.