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Abraham Mountain and the Endless Scree Gully of Pain
Timestamp Free: 2017.08.17 - 12:24:22
Ranges: North America Ranges / Rocky Mountains / Canadian Rockies / Continental Ranges / Front Ranges / First Range
  (1 days)     Elevation Gain: 1570m
Participants:
Eric Coulthard
Difficulty:
3: Some short difficult scrambling along the summit ridge.
Painful endless sidehilling on blocky rocks up the ascent gully. Final traverse to summit is enjoyable but very extremely windy.
Abraham Mountain is a popular mountain for rock climbers and has a famous rock route up to the summit. The descent route which is also the scramble route is known as "The Endless Scree Gully of Pain". A very accurate name as I found out. The view is excellent aside from the awful and painful brick sized scree that you get to contend with for most of the ascent. You have about 1550m of net elevation gain, however there is a lot of loss and regain in the gully of pain. It took me 13 hours including an attempt of nearby Allstones Peak. Without the Allstones Peak attempt it probably would have taken 10 hours. Below is my full account of the epic ascent. Abraham Mountain was not my first choice for ascent this day. Because of the controlled burns up the valley, I chose to ascend something without a smoky view. So I returned to my previously attempted route; "The Endless Scree Gully of Pain". It was just as I had remembered it, except with less snow and more pain. Last time, I went up too early in the year and waist deep postholing turned me around. This time I went too late and missed out on the nice pain free snow. There was still a good amount of snow left that I was happy to use. The route starts at Abraham Slabs; a popular rock climbing area by Abraham Lake. The trail continues up the gully from there. Because the gully has drop offs you need to ascend the right side of the gully to avoid steep slab. There is a lot of up and down at the start and a lot of miserable sidehilling with brick sized rocks. Once you eventually reach the bottom of the gully there will hopefully be some snow to help you up the last part, which is not short by any stretch of the imagination. The final part is steep and exhausting when you run out of snow. When I reached the top of the gully, I was...

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