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Mount King George - Road Access and Climb
Timestamp Free: 2020.08.11 - 08:18:41
Ranges: North America Ranges / Rocky Mountains / Canadian Rockies / Continental Ranges / Park Ranges / Royal Group
  (3 days)
Participants: Reg Bonney; Kelly Adams; Rick Collier
Difficulty: 4: Except for a rope and harness (and perhaps crampons if it is a dry year) no pro is needed, although some parties feel the need to rappel "the dark slot".
Detailed instructions on how to access and climb Mount King George.
Mt. King George is the highest summit in the collection of four spectacular peaks known as the southern Royal Group (Princess Mary, King George, Prince Albert, and Prince George). It was first climbed in August of 1919 by V.A. Fynn and Rudolph Aemmer in what is now considered to be a tour de force route. The preferred route is now a variation on #3 (Hurrell and Mill, 1970) in the guidebook. Except for a rope and harness (and perhaps crampons if it is a dry year) no pro is needed, although some parties feel the need to rappel "the dark slot".

As with so many of the high peaks in the Rockies, it is more the approach than the climb that demands endurance and resourcefulness. A three-day weekend is perhaps sufficient for this climb (and even some of the other summits), but it will mean driving late both the day before the weekend starts and the day it ends. The map for automobile navigation is "Tangle Peak" 82 J/12; for the on-foot approach and the climb itself it is "Kananaskis Lakes" 82 J/11.

Some 20 km E of Radium toward Castle Junction on highway 93 , there is a clearly marked turn-off to the E called "Settler's Road". Although it is a gravel road, it is maintained in excellent condition; but on weekdays be careful of logging trucks.

Approximately 12 km SE on this road brings one to an intersection. Do not continue S, but instead turn left and follow a long curving road that in one km leads to a substantial bridge across the Kootenay River. Once across the river, the road climbs 0.8 km to another intersection -- the lefthand branch follows the Cross and Mitchell Rivers; the righthand (Kootenay Palliser FSR) follows the Kootenay River (at a distance). Take the righthand or SE branch for approximately 18 km, at which point it will curve...

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