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Mount Rainier (Tahoma)  Washington   #4470
Ranges: North America Ranges / Pacific Cordillera Range / Cascade Range / Washington Cascades

Height: 4392 m -> 14409 feet
Prominence?: 4027 m above Armstrong Pass
Line Parent?: Mount Massive (1501.6 km away, at bearing 119 degrees)
Greater Parent: Pico de Orizaba (3810.0 km away)

Location:   46.85283,-121.76033     46:51:10, -121:45:37   10T 594505 5189556 (23 km NE of Ashford).   AreaCode: EM61/IH56
First Ascent: 1870 Hazard Stevens, Philemon van Trump
Mount Rainier from above the Carbon Glacier
This peak is #1 on the Height List for Washington . This peak is #1 in Prominence List for Washington .Mount Rainier, in the state of Washington, is the tallest of the chain of volcanoes that starts at Mount Garibaldi and extends south to Lassen Peak in northern California. However, Mount Adams spreads out over a bigger area. Because it is only 3 hours drive from Vancouver it is often visited by Canadian climbers, as well as climbers from Seattle. These volcanoes are often referred to as being part of the "Cascades" however they obviously have quite a different origin than the Cascades of northern Washington. Having said that, Mount Rainier is the highest peak in the "Cascades", and has the largest glaciers in the lower 48 states until you get into Alaska.

The summit of Mount Rainier has two summit craters. The highpoint of the mountain is called Columbia Crest. The craters are filled with ice, and have a network of ice caverns, carved by heat from the mountain, similar to Mount Baker.

Mount Rainier is not part of a mountain range per-se, it stands alone surrounded by coniferous forests. Above treeline at about 1600 m there are beautiful alpine meadows which in certain seasons are covered with wild flowers.

Mount Rainier is almost always climbed as a glacier climb because the volcanic rock is typically rotten. The upper part of the climb usually requires ice ax and crampons, although it is quite straightforward to ski up to Camp Muir at about 3000 m. There is a large shelter of some sort at Camp Muir, although most parties tent.

Name Notes: The Indian name for Mount Rainier is Tahoma, whence comes the name of the nearby city. Frontier-era legends of giants sleeping in giant, flame-hewn chambers with all kinds of strange electrical devices deep inside the mountain, are thought to be derivations of older Indian legends concerning similarly sleeping giants and lakes of fire inside the mountain (albeit without the Wellsian machineries described in the non-native version).

Route Summaries exist for this mountain, but are only available to paid members.

Trip Reports within 1 km
40 2009.06.27 Mount Rainier - Dissapointment Cleaver Henrik Hinkkala
74 2009.06.12 Mount Rainier - Emmons Winthrop Summit Ski Henrik Hinkkala
47 2003.06.25 A Route Less Traveled: Mount Rainier via Ptarmigan Ridge Doug Artman
35 2001.08.04 Mount Rainier (via Disappointment Cleaver) Martin Godwyn
17 2000.09.22 Mt. Rainier via Disappointment Cleaver Martin Berka
22 1999.05.22 Rainier - Ascent by a classic route Pierre Signore
27 1986.08.01 Mt Rainier and Mt Baker from New Jersey Tom Tiedje

Comments
2004.09.24 Elbert not Saint Elias Robin Tivy
2004.03.02 Verify height is 350 m Fred Touche
2004.03.02 Rainier prominence Mike Cleven
 

Subject Photos   View Thumbnails
27 Camp Schurman, Mount Rainier Jordan Peters
15 Emmons Glacier and the White River Jordan Peters
11 Mount Rainier Summit Fred Touche
10 Mount Rainier and Winthrop Glacier Panorama from Third Burroughs Mountain Lucas Earl
10 Mount Rainier from above the Carbon Glacier Lucas Earl
9 Crevasses on Emmons Glacier Martin Berka
8 Mount Rainier and the Emmons Glacier from the Burroughs Mountain Trail Lucas Earl
8 Moon from the Summit of Rainier Martin Berka
7 Mount Rainier from The Tooth Sandra McGuinness
6 Rainier and the Muir Snowfield Scott Nelson
5 Ski Mountaineer's Nightmare Bernd Petak
5 Emmons Glacier Boardwalk Jordan Peters

Placename Photos
13 Sunrise at the Crater Rim Scott Nelson
6 Crater of Mount Rainier Martin Berka